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Sharry Maan – Aate Di Chiri – The Verdict

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Chakdey.Com’s newest editor and now chief reviewer Ramneek Tung takes on the task of his first review; Sharry Maan’s ‘Aate Di Chiri’. See what he made of the album, what caught his eye and his constructive critique on the release. Let us know what you think of the album and the review itself!

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Chakdey.Com’s newest editor and now chief reviewer Ramneek Tung takes on the task of his first review; Sharry Maan’s ‘Aate Di Chiri’. See what he made of the album, what caught his eye and his constructive critique on the release. Let us know what you think of the album and the review itself in the comments box below!

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Sharry Maan’s ‘Yaar Anmulle‘ was the biggest tune of 2011. Eventually reaching anthem status, the track resonated with Punjabi males yearning to relive their glorious college days. Propelling Sharry Maan to the forefront of the Punjabi music scene, the nostalgia evoking number simultaneously acted as a gift and a curse as it brought him immense fame, but also eclipsed the rest of his debut album.

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Although the album ‘Yaar Anmulle’ had catchy songs like “Chandigarh Da Chaska” and the auto-tune embracing “Kudiyan Te Bussan,” the title track was simply a juggernaut that could have pigeonholed Sharry Maan, potentially relegating the trained civil engineer to one-hit wonder status.  However, earlier this year, Maan unveiled “Pooja Kiven Aa,” the highly successful Jatt & Juliet number. Now proving that he was capable of more than just “Yaar Anmulle,” Sharry Maan is back with his second full length release, Aate Di Chiri. This time around, Maan is not about to be overshadowed by his flagship track as he delivers one of the most lyrically driven albums in years.

Rarely catering to the dance floor, Maan unconventionally opens the album with the heartbreaking title track. Dwelling on lost childhood, the sorrowful lyrics capture the angst and tragedy of NRIs living far away from their families. Nick Dhammu’s reserved production complements the melancholic nature of the lyrics, and features a poignant interpolation of the folk classic “Sadde Ta Vehre Vich,” famously sung by Surinder and Prakash Kaur.

After the tear-jerking opener, the record makes an abrupt transition with the raw folk of “Yenkne” which sees a confident Maan putting the verbal smackdown on an ex-flame. The song initially begins minimally with traditional acoustic instrumentation, but then Dhammu suddenly hits the listener with some contemporary percussion – an album highlight.

As the record progresses, Maan shows off his lyrical dexterity by focusing on a diverse range of themes: failed relationships on “Sohne Mukhre Da,” stardom on “College Wali GT Road,” humorous club outings on the Kuldeep Manak saluting “Disk Ch Kali,” and he even sings from a newlywed bride’s perspective on “Ik Ghar Tera.”

Unfortunately, “Yaar Anmulle” makes an unnecessary appearance towards the end of the album, but it is presented as a new dance-floor friendly remix. Even though the iconic anthem makes its presence known, it doesn’t overshadow the rest of the content as Sharry Maan’s lyrical mastery shines.

Refusing to conform to the generic dhol-obsessed Bhangra formula, Maan has crafted one of the better releases of 2012 with Aate Di Chiri – a meaningful, socially relevant record. In fact, it might just be the most definitive singer-songwriter album since Babbu Maan’s 2001 masterpiece, Saun Di Jhadi.

Let us know what you think of the album and the review in the comments box below!

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